Rebounding is Key

It is rare to see players dominating the glass anymore. You don’t see players like Wilt and Russell anymore who would grab over 20 rebounds PER GAME. That has not been done since those days, but that may not be a bad thing. Today, there is more emphasis on the concept of team rebounding. All five players making an effort to secure missed shots on both the offensive and defensive end. You’ve had your glass-eater since then like Barkley, Rodman, Moses, and Olajuwan, but none of them quite got to the numbers that Wilt and Bill did (although I consider Rodman the best ever considering his size).

Rebounding is extremely important in basketball, maybe the most important thing that can determine who wins the game. Think about it, on the defensive end, securing defensive rebounds holds the opponent to one shot and, if your fast break is run correctly, can even be considered a turnover. The keys to getting defensive rebounds are: forcing missed shots, boxing out, and communicating who will box out who. A good portion of  offensive rebounds can be attributed to someone not being accounted for when the ball is in the air.

On the offensive end of the floor, getting offensive rebounds gets your  team extra shots, which really helps when your offense is struggling. It puts pressure on the defense and forces them to commit more guys to the glass, therefore killing their chances of getting baskets in transition. It can change the outcome off the game because it means more possession for your team.

Yes, there are no more 20 rebounds per game guys, but I like the team-rebounding concept. It makes everyone a threat on the offensive end and neutralizes those threats if done right on thee the defensive end. I’ve played a lot of basketball and watched a lot of basketball, and I can say with confidence that even when playing a team that was much better than we were, when we controlled the glass, we either beat them or had a chance to at the end of the game.

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